Sanctuary

Our summer news has been dominated by swarms of marauding migrants, threatening our standard of living and social infrastructure. Such is the threat that there have been calls to bring in the Army, to create new detention centres, to speed up deportation procedures. There has been outcry against Songs of Praise for wasting licence payers money by filming at St. Michaels Church in the makeshift camp outside Calais known as  “The Jungle”. And now we are faced with the images of Aylan Gurdi’s little body washed up on the seashore. Perhaps that image will change the rhetoric, but the great tragedy is that when you look beyond the rhetoric the numbers of migrants coming to this country are tiny compared to those faced by the countries that surround Syria or border the Mediterranean Sea and yet this need to de-humanise people seeking a better life for themselves and their families is so high on our political and media agenda.

At the heart of these events are individual human stories of aspiration, achievement, adventure – stories that in other contexts we would want to celebrate. But the moment we de-humanise, we also remove our ability to empathise, encourage, welcome and in doing so we lose some of the basic facets humanity. The bible encourages welcome; whether in Leviticus, “The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as a citizen among you; you shall love the stranger as yourself” [19:34] or on the Day of Judgement, “I was a stranger and you welcomed me”, [Matt 25:35] or in early church “Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it.” [Heb 13:2]. Many who de-humanise migrants, are also those who call for Christian Values to return to our country, they seem to have missed the value of welcoming strangers in our midst and in doing so engaging with our own humanity.

We talk about churches as places of Sanctuary, and Coventry is a City of Sanctuary, an organisation I’m pleased to belong to and encourage. We look to find ways to welcome those who seek a new beginning, who invest in their children whilst facing great risks, hardship, discrimination and suspicion. We look to celebrate the skills and insights that peoples stories reveal and in doing so we learn the human story behind scaremongering headlines. This month I hope to share some of those stories as we mark Racial Justice Sunday at St. Columba’s on 6th September and at Stoke Chapel and Hocking Road, Wyken on 13th September and then give thanks for the Harvest on the 20th and 27th September. I look forward to doing so with you.

Be blessed, Craig

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