Retelling an old story

We went to see the new Dad’s Army film last week. I’d heard good reviews and I was encouraged by the cast, but I love the original Dad’s Army programmes – could this live up to it? We have a tendency to remember what has gone before with a sense that it can never be bettered by the present or the future and to want things to be as they always were and so anything new has a lot to live up to.
We enjoyed Dad’s Army, you could see where the new cast were copying the old cast, you could see various nods to the past, and the story line was a bit silly – but then it always was. But as a stand alone film, it made for a pleasant afternoon, it has the usual components mixing slapstick with farce, a bit of adventure and a lot of misunderstanding and we soon forgot what had gone before, enjoyed the present and the way in which this ensemble told the story.
As we move through Lent to Easter there is a sense of going down old familiar routes. We remember this story ever year, so how can it retain it’s wonder, it’s freshness, its passion. How can we feel the pain of betrayal, isolation, loss when we know that Easter is coming? And how can we know the excitement of new life when it feels much the same as it did last year? One way is open our eyes to the present, to be aware of modern stories of betrayal, isolation, loss; to be aware of lives where the hopefulness of Easter can not be imagined. And then to open our eyes to all that is new, exciting, fresh, and celebrate each moment of resurrected new life that causes us to stop and wonder. Another is to be aware that Jesus continues to carry all our betrayal, isolation, loss – past, present and future to the cross and offer each of us the hope of a new future. That does not change, however blasé, or cynical we may be the Easter adventure continues and someone is going to catch it for the very first time – now that is exciting!
be blessed
Craig

A Life Poem

I presented a twig
with the hint of a bud.
“A chance of life?”
“Yes, m’duck ”
And Easter came.

I point across fences
at the fruit filled life.
“We’ll walk around”
“Where’s the fun?”
And Easter came.

I looked on forlornly
at the pile life leaves
“It can’t be done”
“No such word”
And Easter came.

I stand broken and tired
at the foot of life’s hill
“Where to from here?”
“Hang on tight”
And Easter came.

Craig Muir, February 2010

This poem is inspired by my Mother-in Law, Barbara Smith. She had a number of sayings that coloured the way she lived life. It was a positive can do outlook that brought plants to life, enjoyed crab-appling, acquired cuttings and found practical solutions to any problem. Whilst the incidents and sayings are personal to the family, I hope the poem expresses the potential of Lent and you will see Easter come.

Be Blessed
Craig